NEWS

Children’s spending falls, but toys remain relatively unaffected

Published on: 31st January 2018

Children’s spending falls this year, but toys not hit as hard as some other categories, reveals new report.

A new survey of children age 5-16 shows that children’s spending has dropped across all 16 measured spending categories year on year – but toys are one of the least affected.

The 2018 Childwise Monitor report found that fewer children are receiving pocket money or adhoc handouts this year – but those that are still getting an income are getting slightly more than last year. The average weekly pocket money is £11.20 per week – up from £9.70 a year ago.

Simon Leggett, research director at Childwise, commented: “Parents are tightening their belts and are exerting more control over how their children spend money, leaving children with less disposable income as a result.”

The 2018 Childwise Monitor data shows that only three in ten children ever buy toys for themselves, falling marginally from last year. One in six children bought toys for themselves over the previous month, the same proportion as last year. More than a third of 5-16-year olds have toys bought for them by other people, falling after a rise to four in ten a year ago.

Boys and girls are equally likely to buy toys for themselves this year. Self-purchase of toys peaks among more than half of 5-6-year olds, falling across the age range to fewer than one in ten teenage children ever buying.

RECENT ARTICLES

Friday Blog

Do the right thing … it’s the Friday Blog!

Moonbug and IMC announce strategic partnership

Check out the latest roles added to Toy World’s recruitment section

Heathside Trading signs licence agreement with Molang

Hey Hugo welcomes Richard Hawkins as Sales director

Get involved in Toy World’s April Pocket Money & Collectibles feature

All About Games celebrates third anniversary

Las Vegas Licensing Expo offers first look at closing programme

Wyncor appoints two new top sales executives

Get involved in Toy World’s April Pre-school feature